The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History – Best Adapted Screenplay: 1974 Academy Award Posted by Eric nighthawk4486 under Movies , Lists , Literature | Tags: academy awards , adapted screenplay , billy wilder , coppola , film , golden globes , kurosawa , list , literature , mel brooks , robert altman , sidney lumet |

Although this scene appears in the period of the novel, it does not appear in the original novel. Don’s birthday is not mentioned as December 7th in the novel. This is pure Coppola.

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

Note:  If you watch my original Nighthawk Awards, you will only see nine films. But looking at it again

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, which I had to review anyway because it was nominated for a WGA, and the writing was so good it reminded me that it should have been first on my list.

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

Note: Of the 1974 BAFTA Best Screenplay nominees, all five were original (

Like the first film, I watched this film with Veronica, who was seeing it for the first time. He was impressed by the scale of the film and the performances of Pacino and De Niro. His constant refrain throughout the film is, “Oh my God, Fredo, you’re such an idiot.” It’s a great movie, if not the best then certainly one of the greatest sequels of all time. But it’s not the best film of the year (it will be).

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

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I have already written about the novel in my post about the original 1972 film. The parts of the book used in the movie are Book III of the book (covering pages 183-214), but in reality it is only pages 183-199, the rest covering the period between the ending around it. In this film and before the events of the first film.

“From the beginning, Coppola was tempted to tell two stories in his film, the first featuring Vito Corleone as a young man rising to become the most powerful crime family on the East Coast; Another shows his own son, Michael, about the same age, leading a family that is now crumbling and losing its influence.” (

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

“He had very little used material to work on a new picture, and he had ideas for a small part of a novel, Memories in Little Italy.” (Schumacher, p. 162)

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“Most of the events of the modern story were invented by Coppola. Some of them were suggested by the pages of contemporary newspapers. … Young Vito’s memories of life in New York’s Little Italy were taken from material left over from Puzzo’s script, which had nothing to do with the original film. In fact , Book III of the novel is a thirty-page account of the origins of the Mafia in Sicily and Vito Corleone’s rise to power as mob boss when he immigrates to the United States.” (The Godfather: The Intimate Francis Ford Coppola, Gene D. Phillips, p. 115)

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

All of these are accurate – some scenes are drawn and filled in for the film when not in the book (as opposed to the original movie, most of which is taken directly from the book), and almost all of the De Niro movie parts come from the original novel, including some There are notable changes: the mother he was sent to (he wasn’t killed, not to mention his brother), and “he changed his name” in the novel. Instead of changing it, an Ellis Island immigration official told Corleone to “maintain his ties to his homeland” after he killed Fanucci and told him not to go back there. in Sicily to seek revenge on his father’s murderer. None of Michael’s characters are in the novel, they are just continuations of the original characters, but all the actions of all the characters (except Connie, who is more mature in this movie) are beautiful. Consistent with how they are portrayed in the novel and original film.

Directed and directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Screenplay by Francis Ford Coppola and Mario Puzo. Based on the novel The Godfather by Mario Puzo.

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

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There are jokes about how to pronounce the main character’s name, a silly line about arriving at Transylvania Station (after the train starts in New York), lines about being knocked out, and constant rants about how horses react to horses. Name of the influential Frau who presides over the castle. None of those listed there sounds like a list of fun movies. What’s more, it’s not just a wonderful cacophony of comedies, but also one of the most brilliant and innovative comedies of all time. Not only is it great fun, it’s incredibly well made.

Besides Woody Allen, there were two greats working in comedy in the 1970s and they made two films in 1974: Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder. The film was Wilder’s Baby, an idea that revolved around the idea of ​​a grandson ashamed of what his famous grandfather had done (Wilder would make his directorial debut a year later with another novel about his great love. Literature:

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

, re-teaming with Brooks if Brooks did not star in the film (although his theft would spoil the mood Wilder wanted to establish). Wilder had the right idea, so this is not one of Brooks’ best films (and many would say his best), but his finest directorial work. Not only will it have Brooks’ stamp of parodying a genre and being funny enough to think it dies, but it will also have first-rate cinematography, sets and sound. It would take the old Universal horror films and their look and feel (ironically, since this was a 20th Century Fox film) and fuse it with a Brooks/Wilder sense of humor.

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The premise of this movie, a poor doctor who wants to escape his family history, is hilarious. The film work is amazing. Wilder’s performance was funny and brilliant, but for some reason he did not receive a Golden Globe nomination, which is reserved for Best Actor – Comedy / Musical. But perhaps what really makes this movie is the supporting cast. From Marty Feldman as Igor to Terry Garr as the most charming lab assistant, Madeline Hahn, Cloris Leachman, Kenneth Mars and especially Peter Boyle brought humor, wit, anarchy and even ability. Sing and dance as a monster.

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

Not one of the top five films of the year. But this 1974, my year, is the year I have to choose one or the other

, Truffaut and Bergman were both nominated and both lost. There were a lot of great movies this year, but they didn’t make it to the top five.

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

Best Adapted Screenplay: 1974

I already reviewed the novel when I wrote about James Whale’s 1931 magnum opus here (in 2013 – the project has been going on for quite some time). It is a great novel in my top 200, and if you want to rank it as one of the greatest horror novels ever written. But you don’t need this (read more about this in the original review).

One thing I did not make clear in my original version is that there are many cheaper versions of the novel, but the best version

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

(Image at right). The original is out of print, but used ones should be easy to find (though not necessarily cheap), and the author who made them did a great job.

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. But like these original annotated books, new editions are now available and you can find them easily.

The Art Of Adapting Classics For The Silver Screen: Must-see Adaptations In Film History

It’s a parody and a sequel (“We’ve been through this five times before”), so it’s not quite an adaptation of the book, but includes parts of the book and parts of the earlier film. Gives them a sense of humor. We get a glimpse of the original work based on the original film rather than the novel. We have a scene from the original script (and the second film) that is the funniest part of the movie (“I’ll make an espresso”). The scene with the little girl from the first movie was moved for a lighter ending. Very few traces come from the mother

Must see in la, must see in honolulu, must see in barcelona, must see in maui, must see classics, must see in rome, must see in milwaukee, must see in oahu, must see in iceland, must see in florence, must see movie classics, movie classics you must see

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